Monthly Archives: October 2012

Take the 30 second NHL lockout poll

Take 30 seconds and answer our one-question poll on the NHL Lockout.

Have more to say on the topic? The comments section is available for that below or jump into the discussion about the lockout poll on reddit.

Past words of lockout wisdom from The Washington Post’s Thomas Boswell

The Washington Post’s sports columnists may be failing to write about the current NHL lockout, but they’ve had plenty to say about past collective bargaining agreement battles. In looking through some old Post pieces on the subject, I came across one from March 2011, written by Thomas Boswell on the NFL labor dispute.

Much of Boswell’s column, which suggested that the NFL learn from baseball’s 1994-95 strike and the damage it did to that sport, applies to the current NHL situation as well. Hockey fans might enjoy this part in particular:

There’s another side of the coin: our side. Fans of the NFL, even the most ardent, should also learn something from baseball’s misery: Don’t care. Or care as little as you can. Don’t live and die with the latest twist in talks. If the current 24-hour extension leads to progress, that’s great. But if this moment of hope leads to nothing, be prepared to mock both sides and, when you can, try to laugh. That’s the only pleasure we’re going to get.

Because there is one certainty when labor fights get this intense: Neither side cares about you. If you pick a favorite and scream your opinion, then you’re probably the sucker. The owners will only listen to those who back them. The same goes for the players.

The sound that really worries them is silence. Try to provide it.

Perhaps the scariest parallel between baseball then and football now is the idea that the healthier the sport, the less likely a disaster. That’s backward. Lots of money on the table brings out the worst in people, seldom the best.

I’m not ready to go silent yet, but I’m certainly not taking sides either. I place blame for hockey’s current situation on both the owners—whose side includes three-time lockout commissioner Gary Bettman—and the players.

Now’s a fine time to make noise that you don’t appreciate what any of the parties involved in this lockout are doing to the fans. But more importantly, the time when people can really make an impact is when the games finally start-up again. That’s when silence could speak volumes or perhaps millions is a better word, as in millions of dollars in lost revenue.

As I wrote in a lockout-related post earlier this week, “Having waited out a few of these NHL dramas before, I wouldn’t mind seeing the league struggle to draw spectators before things return to normal. Considering the two sides had years to negotiate a new collective bargaining agreement that could have prevented the cancellation of games and satisfied all parties—including the seemingly forgotten customers—Bettman, the owners and the players deserve it, especially when they’ve behaved as if they learned little, if anything at all, about fan frustration from the 2004-05 lockout.”

Make noise now or go about your business quietly. But when hockey returns, that’s when it’s time for the fans to impose their own lockout, rather than going rushing back to games as if nothing ever happened. Sparse attendance, lackluster merchandise sales and poor television ratings are ways the public can send some well-earned frustration back in the direction of the owners and players.

Perhaps the NHL will never learn, but I’m willing to take a chance that they might by taking my entertainment dollars elsewhere for a bit.

As NHL’s latest lockout lingers on, a basement hockey league goes overseas

Habits and even loyalties can change during an NHL lockout, and that’s especially possible during the 2012 edition, as fans sour on a league that has played the work stoppage card four times since 1992. As the NHL owners and players squabble, the hockey-starved can find games elsewhere, from college to the minors or even overseas, where many NHL players have gone in search of playing time and a paycheck.

Monday afternoon, I showed my four-year old, hockey-crazy son an online stream of Washington Capitals stars Alex Ovechkin and Nicklas Backstrom playing together in the KHL for Dynamo Moscow against former Caps goaltender Semyon Varlamov and his team, Lokomotiv Yaroslavl.

My son doesn’t fully understand the NHL lockout, but he knows it’s hockey season here in North America and that his favorite team isn’t playing until the owners and the players come to a new agreement. He had a few questions as I showed him Ovechkin and Backstrom on the ice together, and he was excited to see some hockey.

As I watched more of the game, my son went into the other room, grabbed his gloves and stick, and started playing a game of basement hockey as he does almost every day—except this time the two teams involved were from the KHL. He ran into the room every couple of minutes with game updates and questions, such as how to say “Varlamov’s team’s name again,” and eventually Ovechkin scored in a shootout to give Moscow a big victory in our downstairs arena.

Should the lockout go much longer, my family and I will likely seek out some live, non-NHL hockey to fill the void left by the absence of Caps games at Verizon Center. Maybe it will be an AHL or ECHL game or some college hockey. Whatever it is, I can’t help but wonder what will happen with younger fans like my son if the NHL cancels most or all of the 2012-13 season.

I already know that I, like some other fans I’ve spoken with, are frustrated enough by the NHL and NHLPA’s inability to get a deal done that we won’t be rushing to the games as soon as they start-up again. Sooner or later though, I’ll get the urge to venture back into an NHL arena. I imagine it could be requests from my kids to go to Caps games again that first lead me back to Commissioner Gary Bettman’s league. But what if by the time the NHL resumes games, their favorite team is the Hershey Bears or someone else?

If the owners and players keep their ridiculousness going much longer and younger fans latch onto teams from other leagues, perhaps some customers will be gone for a while; I doubt many will be gone for good. Having waited out a few of these NHL dramas before, I wouldn’t mind seeing the league struggle to draw spectators before things return to normal. Considering the two sides had years to negotiate a new collective bargaining agreement that could have prevented the cancellation of games and satisfied all parties—including the seemingly forgotten customers—Bettman, the owners and the players deserve it, especially when they’ve behaved as if they learned little, if anything at all, about fan frustration from the 2004-05 lockout.

For now though, there’s a kid in my house who’s just thrilled to have some hockey to watch and mimic. It doesn’t seem to matter much to him that it’s not the NHL brand.

Where are the Washington Post sports columnists on the NHL lockout?

The NHL is now one month into a lockout that has delayed the start of the 2012-13 season. Games have been canceled and the league and the players association are engaged in back and forth that fans and local business owners hope will soon lead to some hockey.

Here in D.C., the Caps would have opened their season at home last Friday night against the Stanley Cup runner-up New Jersey Devils and, while Washington Post Caps beat reporter Katie Carrera continues to cover the sport, there’s been almost no mention of the NHL work stoppage by any of the paper’s sports columnists. Save for one piece which featured the fake diary of league commissioner Gary Bettman, I’ve yet to see a Post Sports opinion item on a topic that seems worth at least a column or two by now.

I realize that the Nats’ playoff run and the excitement around RG3 and the Redskins have been the main focus for sports pundits in this town lately, as they should be. But a major team in Washington is currently season-less and that deserves some ink from the columnists with the city’s largest newspaper.

Are you wearing your NHL gear during the lockout? And other thoughts

A Reddit commenter, reacting to my post about the Caps’ merchandise tweet yesterday, touched on something I’ve faced during the NHL lockout myself. “I won’t even wear Caps stuff that I already own, let alone buy new stuff,” they wrote.

Like that fan, I don’t have much desire to put on my Washington Capitals gear these days. The red Caps hat I normally wear often, it now sits at home and my team t-shirts haven’t seen the light of day in a few weeks.

This isn’t my way of protesting or making a statement. I have no plans to burn jerseys in the streets (though gathering with a few thousands fans peacefully outside the NHL Store near Times Square certainly has some appeal). I’m mostly just too frustrated with the league and the players to wear these things. The two sides have had years under the old collective bargaining agreement to figure out where to go next with their arrangement and to avoid another lockout, yet here we are again. I see hockey merchandise in my house and I just kind of think, “jerks,” before finding something else to wear.

I posted something on Twitter about the lack of enthusiasm for donning Caps gear at the moment and got a few responses from other people who feel similarly:

As much as I love Caps hockey, color me unexcited to rock any red at least until things are resolved, or likely even longer as a result of watching the two parties drag things out like they don’t have a care in the world when hockey starts up again. With as infrequently as the two parties get together to negotiate, I have to wonder if they’re truly taking much time at all to consider the fans or the thousands of businesses and employees they’re hurting (see the “Related article” section below for some examples). Their lack of urgency speaks volumes.

The longer the two sides take to get a deal done, the closer we get to pitchers and catchers reporting. Once that happens, it’s hard to say how long it will be until I invest much time and money into hockey again. Major League Baseball seems to have learned something from its past labor struggles; why the NHL hasn’t is an enigma (miss you, Sasha!). What about you, Commissioner Bettman, do you know why this keeps happening?

Related articles

That Caps tweet about 85% off merchandise seems to be going well (not really)

The Washington Capitals sent a tweet at 1pm today telling people to “Stop by the Verizon Center Team Store today. A large selection of merchandise is 85% off!” The responses they’ve received back so far on Twitter are right in line with what you might expect during an NHL lockout that has many fans frustrated, as they go without hockey while waiting for the owners and players to sign a new collective bargaining agreement.

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

%d bloggers like this: